Sigma 50-100mm f/1.8 DC HSM ART ( Canon ) - Review / Test - Sample Images & Verdict
Lens Reviews - Canon EOS (APS-C)

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Make Canon
Model Canon EOS 7D Mark II
ISO Speed 200
Focal Length 50.0mm
Aperture: f/6.3
Exposure 1/160s
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS 7D Mark II
ISO Speed 1600
Focal Length 56.0mm
Aperture: f/1.8
Exposure 1/640s
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS 7D Mark II
ISO Speed 3200
Focal Length 50.0mm
Aperture: f/1.8
Exposure 1/30s
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS 7D Mark II
ISO Speed 320
Focal Length 50.0mm
Aperture: f/1.8
Exposure 1/640s
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS 7D Mark II
ISO Speed 1600
Focal Length 50.0mm
Aperture: f/1.8
Exposure 1/80s
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS 7D Mark II
ISO Speed 100
Focal Length 50.0mm
Aperture: f/7.1
Exposure 1/160s
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS 7D Mark II
ISO Speed 100
Focal Length 100.0mm
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure 1/640s
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS 7D Mark II
ISO Speed 100
Focal Length 52.0mm
Aperture: f/1.8
Exposure 1/8000s
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS 7D Mark II
ISO Speed 100
Focal Length 100.0mm
Aperture: f/1.8
Exposure 1/1250s

Verdict

The Sigma 50-100mm f/1.8 DC HSM ART is a quite awesome tele-zoom lens for portraits - it is very sharp in the image center and it has a very good bokeh. However, at least technically it has its weaknesses. The outer image field is good but it stays short of brilliant. Whether this matters is a different question. Do you really need tack sharp corners at f/1.8? The amount of vignetting is typical for a fast APS-C format lens. Image distortions are quite low, especially at the extreme ends of the range.

If you have hoped for an APS-H lens (e.g. for the Sigma Quattro SD H) - this is feasible. You will have to live with a tad more vignetting, higher borders CAs and somewhat softer corners though.

The build quality is on a professional level - that is with the exception of the tripod mount which is a little short really and the lack of weather sealing. Other than that it rivals Canon L class lenses in this respect. This also applies the AF speed which is among the fastest that we've ever seen from a Sigma lens. The omission of an image stabilizer may feel odd these days but the optical design is already quite complex as is so it was probably a sensible choice by Sigma to skip it for now.

So can this lens serve as a full substitution for a comparable full format setup ? Mostly yes but does it make sense as well? It's not the fault of the lens but APS-C has been neglected by Canon (and Nikon) for quite some time - most APS-C (semi-)pro ultra-wide and standard zoom lenses are dated by now. For really serious prime lenses you will have to go for full format lenses anyway. Still, APS-C has its advantages such as lower pricing and some extra "reach" with long tele lenses. And, of course, there's nothing wrong with sticking to APS-C anyway. If you intend to do so, the Sigma is certainly one of the most interesting choices for this format.

Optical Quality:
Mechanical Quality:
Price/Performance:
      
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